Squaw Valley’s Public Relations Director Gives Statement Regarding Water Issues

 

Squaw Valley is resort open year round and a part of Alpine Meadows. It has nonstop year-round events and holds almost 60 bars, restaurants, and boutiques. It is known as the spring skiing capital because it gives one of the longest ski and snowboard seasons in the Lake Tahoe area. It features 14 easy-to-navigate mountain zones and is internationally renowned. Squaw Valley was voted 2016’s “Best Ski Resort” on the continent, by USA Today and 10 Best Reader’s Choice.

 

Squaw Valley has been put under speculation in recent news due to water issues. On November 8th, a report was made to the Placer County Department of Environmental Health based on a potential health issue at the resort.

E. coli and coliform bacteria were detected in the resort’s drinking water on the upper mountain. Since the report was made the water has been consistently treated and has consistently shown improvement. Low levels of coliform and no E. coli have been found in three out of the four wells that serve the upper mountain.

 

The resort is still open to skiers and snowboarders but the restaurants and bars have been closed. No one is allowed to drink the water until the issue has been totally resolved and no health issues related to the water have been reported.

 

 

On November 30th, a statement was made by Squaw Valley’s Public Relations Director, Liesl Kenney. Squaw Valley wanted to clear the air and inform both their customers, patrons, and the public that they were doing everything they could.

 

 

Kenney stated that an unusually heavy storm in October had affected many water systems in the county. At the resort in particular, the weather had led to an inundation of a water system they had recently upgraded and installed over the past summer. This inundation of the updated system led to its contamination. The contamination was strictly limited to that particular water system and Squaw Valley is positive that no other systems were affected. Kenney claims that at no point was the contaminated water ever available to the public.

 

During a routine testing, Squaw Valley detected the issue in the water and immediately contacted the proper authorities, the Placer County Environmental Health department and the Squaw Valley Public Service District. They also took extra precautions and immediately began consultations with other water safety experts. With everyone’s help, they began taking the proper steps to address the issue and Squaw Valley vows to continue taking these steps until the issue is resolved.

 

Squaw Valley will not return to their regular water usage in that area until them and the proper authorities are assured that the water is safe from health officials. The safety of their customers and patrons is Squaw’s Valley most important concern right now and Kenney assured the public that Squaw Valley is taking this matter very seriously.

 

While the water issue is being taken care of, Squaw Valley is offering their guests full access to the resort’s facilities and giving free bottled water for drinking. Kenney assures the public that they will give updates to the situation as they become available.

 

 

Source: Squaw Valley issues statement on upper mountain water quality